Vietnam: Mekong Delta

Just south of Ho Chi Minh City is the fertile Mekong Delta.  This area is a cultural hotspot, and a great place to see the way that most Vietnamese people live, outside of the cities.

We took a two-day, one-night trip down to the delta and stayed in a village families home for the overnight.  That was my favorite part!

The tour felt a bit like a shallow overview, but it really was neat to catch a glimpse of many different traditional occupations and the vibrant life in general of this area.

We boarded a boat when we got to the delta, and made stops at different islands along the way.  Michaela and I were some of the last on, but got the awesome seats that had gone unnoticed! 🙂

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We learned that the water wasn’t brown because it was dirty, but because it was very nutrient rich.  The nutrients in the Mekong River make it excellent for cultivating rice – 80% of the world’s rice is grown along this river!

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Here are some of the things that we got to experience:

1. The production of coconut candies
These candies were super delicious! They had many flavors including chocolate, ginger, and durian (yuck!).

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We also randomly had the chance to hold snakes at this stop…

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2. A bee farm
We were able to see the bees, which I didn’t love as much, and then were served a traditional drink that the Vietnamese believe adds longevity to your life.  It was a honey tea, but also contained pollen.

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 3. A city that uses canals for transportation
We were rowed in canoes through a village.  The sweetest older man was one of the rowers on ours!  We were able to see parts of the village and the beginnings of new boats that were being hollowed out.

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4. Rice noodle “factory”
These people worked with unbelievable efficiency!  The rice husks are used for the fire, the rice for the batter.  They spread a thin layer and move to their second stove top while they wait.  A second person grabs them as they are ready and lays them out to dry.  After they dry, they’re cut into noodles.  So interesting!

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After a full day of hopping around to different places, we lugged our things deep into a village in the woods and set up for the night.  The boy at the home we were staying at was an incredible 11-year-old boy that aspired to be a tour guide.  He had great English and possibly the most winning personality of any human being on earth.  He definitely is the one who made the homestay what it was!
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The next morning, we visited a floating market.  It was over a hundred years old, and is traditionally how people in this area have done their trading.  I especially enjoyed this part because it didn’t feel very touristy – villagers were legitimately going about there business, and we got to sit in for a bit and watch.  AND I got a pineapple.  So it was a great visit.
(a big thank you to Michaela for sharing some of these pictures!)
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Finally, we ended the trip at a fish and vegetable market nearby.  I hated the smell but loved the colors!
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6 thoughts on “Vietnam: Mekong Delta

    • Hi Courtney! So excited for you and your Vietnam trip! You’ll have a great time 🙂 For the life of me, I can’t remember the name of the tour company … I’m so sorry! We weren’t crazy about them though. There are tons of tour companies along the main tourist street, and most of them will book you for a trip the day before.

  1. Hello, can you send me contact the beekeeper from bee farm on the foto, please? We are beekeepers from the Czech republic and would like to visit farm in Vietnam. Thank you very much, have a nice time, Lenka

    • Hi lenka- I hope you do get the chance to visit Vietnam – it’s an incredible country! Unfortunately I don’t have their contact information – we went through a tour agency. It will be easy for you to find a tour group that will go there though; this one was in the Mekong delta.

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